Saturday, May 16, 2020

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Your Maternal Grandfather's Matrilineal Line

From Randy over at Genea-Musings:

it's Saturday Night 
time for more Genealogy Fun!!!



Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to:

(1) What was your mother's father's full name?

(2)  What is your mother's father's matrilineal line? That is, his mother's mother's mother's... back to the most distant female ancestor in that line.  Provide her ahnentafel number (relative to you), her birth and death years, and places.

(3) Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment to this blog post, or in a post on Facebook.

Here's mine:

(1)  My maternal grandfather was #6, Charles Morgan Tapley (1907-1973).


(2)  Charles's mother was #13, Mattie Schwalls (1877-1912). Mattie was born in Georgia, married Lusion Keman Tapley in 1903 in Johnson County, Georgia, and died in Johnson County, Georgia.  


Mattie's mother was #27, Lincelia "Celia" E. Claxton (1839-1882).  Lincelia was born in Edgefield County, South Carolina.  She married George W Schwalls Sr in 1866 in Edgefield County, South Carolina.  She died in Georgia.


Lincelia Claxton's mother was #55,  Lincelia "Lincely" Bush (1806-1872).  Lincelia was born in Edgefield, Edgefield, South Carolina.  She married Zachariah William Claxton in 1823 in Edgefield, Edgefield, South Carolina.  She died in Johnson County, Georgia.

Lincelia Bush's mother was #111, Mary Frances Miller (1785-1857).  Mary was born in South Carolina.  She married John Bibby Bush in 1800 in Edgefield County, South Carolina.  She died in Edgefield County, South Carolina.

Mary Frances's mother was #223, Martha Martin (1762-1864).  Martha was born in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina.  She married Jacob Miller, date and location unknown.  She died in South Carolina.

Other than the migration to the south, these ladies tended to stay  where they were born.  

I actually was able to find Martha Martin thanks to this blog post and Ancestry.com.  So I was able to take the family back one generation!  

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks (Week 19): Service

Amy Johnson Crow from Generations Cafe is hosting a blog writing prompt this year called 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.  Since I need a swift kick in the you-know-what to get me blogging more regularly again, I thought I'd jump in.  I like that she gives us "permission" to interpret the prompt however we wish and share it however we wish.  It doesn't have to be a blog post; it could be a family video, a letter to a child or grandchild, an e-mail, etc.  I'm probably going to be always behind on this exercise so don't go by the date and week I'm writing about and take it as accurate.  

On this journey of researching my family history, I'm constantly surprised by how many relatives there actually are, the diversity of what they did for a living, and the uncovering of a very interesting (or sad) tale about a cousin or other relative I never met.  Now I know that some people are going to think I have no right to write about someone I have never met just because I am related to them.  And there is some truth to that.  However, I do not write about anyone to judge or to elicit a thrill in my readers.  I write to share the history of my family.  Careers, how many children they had, how many times they were married, their cause of death, if they were murdered, or if they murdered someone... all of that adds to the tapestry that is my family.  Here I'm going to share another story about a relative that I never had the opportunity to meet.

In the email that Amy Johnson Crow sent out about this week's theme, she put some suggestions out there for this topic of Service.  Most people would probably think of military service first.  But then she mentioned service station owners... and the following came to me.

On December 20, 1970, Joe Milton Fletcher, age 59, a gasoline service station attendant, was robbed and murdered for $73 while at work at the station.  He was murdered simply for money and so he couldn't identify who killed him.  His killer's story reads like the stories we read today about criminals, their crimes, and whether they should be paroled. 

William Joseph 'Junior' Pierce was born in Emanuel County, Georgia in 1931.  He was described as a coward who would not hurt anyone who looked him in the eye.  His parents divorced when he was 14, he quit the 10th grade at age 17, joined the Army, but his mother got him out on a hardship discharge within three months, his wife divorced him, and then ended up working at a furniture factory in Swainsboro.  In 1959, Pierce was sentenced to 3-5 years for burglary.  He served 32 months in a public works camp.  After being free only a few weeks, he was arrested again for burglarizing and torching a Canoochee store.  He got 10-20 years in state prison.

While serving his time, he was convicted of other burglaries, and that, along with an attempted prison break, got him 43-56 years.  But in May 1970, Pierce was paroled even though a prison psychologist said he was a possible psychopath who might be a danger to himself or others.

Pierce was arrested less than a year later - on March 13, 1971 - originally for seven murders in south Georgia and South Carolina.  By June, two more murders indictments had been added.  His victims were:

- June 27, 1970:  Ann Goodwin, 19, North Augusta, South Carolina was shot and and killed while babysitting

- July 1970: Virginia Main, 20, Gastonia, North Carolina

- August 1970: James Sires, 40, Beaufort, South Carolina

- December 13, 1970: Margaret "Peggy" Cuttino, age 13, of Sumter, South Carolina disappeared.  When her body was found on December 26, she had been struck on the head and strangled.

- December 20, 1970: Joe M. Fletcher, 59, a Vidalia, Georgia service station attendant who was shot and killed during an apparent robbery.  Joe was married to my 4th cousin, 1x, Dorothy Phillips.  

- December 22, 1970:  Kathy Jo Anderson, 17, disappeared from her Lexington, South Carolina home and her body was discovered February 17, 1971.

- January 12, 1971:  Mrs. Lacy Thigpen, 51, of Treutlen County, Georgia, who was shot and killed during an apparent robbery of a rural grocery store near Soperton

- January 22, 1971:  Helen H Wilcox, age 32, who disappeared from her husband's small country store near Hazlehurst, Georgia.  Pierce himself led the Jeff Davis County Sheriff to Mrs. Wilcox's body after his arrest.

- January 28, 1971:  Vivian Miles, age 60, Appling County, Georgia grocer who was shot and killed during an apparent robbery of her rural store.  Her 5 year old granddaughter was severely beaten but survived. 

Then (1971)
Now (after serving more than 48 years)
In all he confessed to all 9 murders, though he later denied them.  He was given life sentences in seven of the slayings, including Joe Fletcher's. 

Believe it or not, I found that Junior Pierce is still alive and serving his life sentences at Georgia Diagnostic Class Prison in Jackson.  He is now 88 years old. 

Four of his nine victims worked in small country stores or service stations.  Like the convenience stores of today, those stores are dangerous because of either their rural location or the late hours they are open. 

A dangerous person was paroled and then committed murder.  Junior Pierce killed nine people before he was caught.  Nine families destroyed.  The families will never get over the pain of their loved one being murdered. 

A felon was able to get a gun to go on a shooting spree. 

History repeats itself. 

Sources:

* "State Parolee Accused in Seven Murder Cases," Marietta Journal, Marietta, Georgia, May 5, 1971.

 * "Accused killer may await trial until October," The Augusta Chronicle, Tuesday, May 11, 1971.

* "Pierce trial postponed following judge's death," The Augusta Chronicle, September 20, 1971.

* "Cold-Blooded Killer," by Joseph McNamara, Daily News, New York, New York, Sunday, October 3, 1999, page 54.

* "Serial Murderer, now 88, Still in Prison," Jeff David Ledger, Hazlehurst, Georgia, October 23, 2019, online, https://www.jdledger.com/2019/10/23/serial-murderer-now-88-still-in-prison/

Saturday, April 25, 2020

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - What is Your Birth Surname Henry Number?

From Randy over at Genea-Musings:

it's Saturday Night 
time for more Genealogy Fun!!!



Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to:

(1) Do you know what a "Henry Number" is? It is a descendant numbering system from a specific person.  The Wikipedia article for Genealogical Numbering Systems describes it as:

"The Henry System is a descending system created by Reginald Buchanan Henry for a genealogy of the families of the presidents of the United States that he wrote in 1935.[3] It can be organized either by generation or not. The system begins with 1. The oldest child becomes 11, the next child is 12, and so on. The oldest child of 11 is 111, the next 112, and so on. The system allows one to derive an ancestor's relationship based on their number. For example, 621 is the first child of 62, who is the second child of 6, who is the sixth child of his parents.


In the Henry System, when there are more than nine children, X is used for the 10th child, A is used for the 11th child, B is used for the 12th child, and so on. In the Modified Henry System, when there are more than nine children, numbers greater than nine are placed in parentheses."

(2)  Go to your first known ancestor with your birth surname in your software program and calculate your Henry Number from that person. Show each generation of your line of ancestors with your birth surname with their Henry numbers.

(3)  Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment to this blog post, or in a post on Facebook.

Here's mine:

First of all, I am going to admit that I had never heard of the Henry System nor have I paid any attention to any other numbering system out there.  It's never too late to learn something new.  

My first known ancestor with my birth surname of Tapley is Hosea Tapley (1691-1778).  Here is my Tapley line with their Henry numbers:

1                                    Hosea Tapley (1691-1778)
13                                 Joel Tapley (abt 1720-abt 1790-1791)
132                               Newhampton Tapley (?-1807)
1321                             Sarah Tapley (1775-bet 1850-1860)*
13211                           George Washington Tapley (1814-aft 1880)
132112                        James Madison Tapley (1847-1912)
1321123                     Lusion Keman Tapley (1870-1935)
13211236                  Gilbert Earl Tapley (1928-2008)
132112362                Mary Elizabeth Tapley (1967-)  ** This is ME!

*Yes, I know something is different on my Descendents report.  There is a woman listed!  That is probably not proper in the serious genealogy research world, however, I can tell you that my family tree is not normal or "proper."  Sarah Tapley had her children out of wedlock.  It is/was well known who the father was, but Sarah never married and chose to give her children the Tapley name.  Therefore, the following generations are Tapleys... and not Swains.  

Also, Sarah had twins.  So I do not know if George Washington was born first or his brother, but the report chose George Washington.  

I actually think I should have been 13211264 because my father had children with a previous wife, but that's not how my software program figured it.  It seems the program has his wives out of order.  

I probably do not have a full listing of children for the earlier generations.  That issue, along with program fallacies such as mentioned above, I'm not sure the Henry Numbering System is for me.  However, it was good to get the exposure to something new.  

I use Family Tree Maker 2019 and used the Descendant Report for this information.  I could choose between four different numbering systems, and the only Henry was "Modified Henry."  I don't know what the modifications are.  

I'm headed to share this information now!  Happy Saturday!

Saturday, April 18, 2020

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Which Ancestors Would You Like to Talk To?

From Randy over at Genea-Musings:

it's Saturday Night 
time for more Genealogy Fun!!!



Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to:

(1) We sometimes find we have questions we would love to discuss with our ancestors - the who, what, when, why, and how questions that might help with our genealogy research.  

(2)  Which ancestors would you like to talk to?  What questions would you ask?

(3)  Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment to this blog post, or in a post on Facebook.

Here's mine:

(1)  Of course, the first ancestor I'd like to question is my 2nd great grandfather, George W. Schwalls, Sr. (1837-1908).  I would ask him where in Germany he was from; who his parents and grandparents were; how he came to America and with whom; how did he become an American citizen; and how is he related to the George Michael Schwall that lived one county over?  Oh, and how did he meet his wife, my 2nd great grandmother, Lincelia E. Claxton (1839-1882)?

(2)  My grandmother, Nealie Drake Tapley, 1895-1970:  I would ask my grandmother who were all the people in the unmarked photos she left behind.  

3)  I would ask my 2nd great grandmother, Elizabeth (1824-aft 1880), married to George Washington Tapley (1814-aft 1880) what her maiden name was??

(4)  I would ask my 2nd great grandmother, Elizabeth Caroline Scoggins (1802-1880), married to Solomon Page (1800-1860) who her parents and grandparents were.

(5)  I would probably have some very personal questions for my 3rd great grandmother, Sarah Tapley (1775-bet 1850-1860).  Like how did she deal with having her twin boys (George Washington [1814-aft 1880] and James Marion [1814-1884]) out of wedlock and dealing with the treatment she must have received because of that?  And why she fell for a married man (Canneth Swain, 1770-1831)?  Why did she give the twins her last name when they grew up knowing who their father was?? And what was her mother's name?  

(6)  I would like to sit all the Hosea Tapleys down and ask them which one was which and who was married to whom already?!  Hosea Tapley, 1691-1778, my 6th great grandfather; Hosea Tapley Jr, bet 1708-1710 - 1770, my 6th great-uncle; Hosea Tapley III, abt 1730-1779, my 1st cousin, 6x removed; Hosea Green Tapley, 1767-1799, my 2nd cousin, 5x removed; and Hosea Tapley, dates unknown, my 3rd cousin, 4x removed, son of Hosea Green.  

(7)  My 2nd great grandparents, Charles Kelso Carter (1843-1916) and Sarah Schoonover (1840-1918):  I would ask them if they or their parents knew the biological parents of their adopted daughter, Bessie Alice Carter (1883-1960), my great-grandmother.  If so, who were they???  

 Those are the biggies.  I am sure I'm going to be the one in heaven running around with a clipboard and pen, from ancestor spirit to ancestor spirit, asking them a million questions!

Saturday, April 4, 2020

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Your Oldest Family Photos

From Randy over at Genea-Musings:

it's Saturday Night 
time for more Genealogy Fun!!!



Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to:

(1) What are the oldest family photos that you have?  Can you date them? Do  you know who is in them?

(2)  Show us one or more of your oldest photos and provide a date and the subjects (if you can).

(3)  Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment to this blog post, or in a post on Facebook.

Here's mine:

(1)  I believe this is my great-grandfather, James Madison Tapley, 1847-1912.  I have no idea when this picture was taken but it is certainly old.  I wonder if it's from the Civil War era. 


(2)  While I do not know who this person is, I believe he is from the Drake family, as this was one of several unlabeled pictures I found in my grandmother Nealie Drake Tapley's belongings. 



(3)  This picture is of my great-grandparents, James Madison "Jim" Tapley, 1847-1912, and Rebecca Page Tapley, 1844-1924.  I do not know when it was taken
but he passed away in 1912, so it was shortly before then.



(4)  My 2nd great-grandfather, Comfort Ranney, 1838-1920.

                                            

(5) My 3rd great-grandfather (Comfort's father), Luther Boardman Ranney, 1809-1890, and his second wife, Caroline Clapp, 1821-1895.  I don't actually have this picture in my possession; I found it on online.  It is very old.


If anyone reading this wants to take a shot at dating these picture for me, I would love that!

Monday, March 30, 2020

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks (Week 13): Nearly Forgotten

Amy Johnson Crow from Generations Cafe is hosting a blog writing prompt this year called 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.  Since I need a swift kick in the you-know-what to get me blogging more regularly again, I thought I'd jump in.  I like that she gives us "permission" to interpret the prompt however we wish and share it however we wish.  It doesn't have to be a blog post; it could be a family video, a letter to a child or grandchild, an e-mail, etc.  I'm probably going to be always behind on this exercise so don't go by the date and week I'm writing about and take it as accurate.  

When I was a child, it was common practice to go to the family cemetery(ies) fairly frequently and clean up around the graves of our loved ones.  This was before the days of perpetual care.  These were (still are) country churches where the only lawn care was cutting the grass around the church.  There was nobody but a person's family to keep the weeds and ants from taking over their headstone.  

Maybe that's why I still enjoy visiting cemeteries (and my deep, abiding addiction to family history and genealogy!) .  When I go to Georgia to visit, we always end up at a cemetery before the visit is over.  With this last visit, we visited probably no less than 5!!  I do believe that every person should be memorialized and remembered after they are gone.  There should be a marker, a sign on a crypt, or information added to a sign to announce that someone was here and lived between those dashes.  With the popularity of cremation, markers are becoming more scarce.  I realize in many instances, the choice of cremation is based on financial means.  However, maybe there should be a wall in each cemetery on which those people's names and dates could be listed so that family and friends can visit.  (Similar to the Vietnam Wall in Washington, D.C.  It is very moving for a family to find their loved one's name on that wall.)  That should be much less expensive than a headstone.  

I would go so far as to say that when there is no grave nor crypt, the person becomes nearly forgotten.  

Before I was even thought about or a twinkle in my mama's eye as us southerners say, my parents had a child in 1963.  A boy who was premature and only lived eight hours.  They named him Michael Edward Tapley.  My parents were living in Jacksonville, Florida at the time, had not been together much more than a year, and had very little money.  Michael was buried at Restlawn Memorial Park in Jacksonville, Florida.  There was no money to place a marker on his grave.  Life went on, my parents left Jacksonville, and there little Michael laid there - nearly forgotten.

Fast forward some 30 odd years later.  I, the little sister, am now an adult and want to help my parents - especially my father who was nearing the end of his life - do this honor they were unable to do at the time.

So I went to Restlawn.  We found through their records exactly where his grave was.  I contacted someone who did grave markers at this cemetery.  Several months later, Michael Edward Tapley was memorialized. 


No longer "nearly forgotten"
Please see a previous post about my brother here.  

Then there was my Uncle Jack Dempsey Tapley.  Uncle Dempsey lived with us for a time when I was a child.  So naturally, we were close.  I have written on this blog before about our relationship and how even those we looked up to as children were merely human and made mistakes.  That does not change the fact that he was my uncle and he was very good to me.  

He moved out, and I grew up.  We lost touch.  I think I only saw him once as an adult.  Then in 1994, I received word that he had passed away.  I must have found out too late to even attend his funeral.  Some more years passed, and I finally began to look for where he was buried.  I discovered he was buried in Augusta, Georgia at Hillcrest Memorial Park.  Then I found out he had no grave marker!  I was shocked and outraged.  He deserved his memorial.  He had been nearly forgotten by his immediate family and by me for many years.  So I worked to make it right.  With help from my father and a cousin, I got a marker put on Uncle Dempsey's resting place.  Now Hillcrest is one of those perpetual care places, but I still check in occasionally when I'm visiting.  I have had to bring the office's attention to the condition of his marker now and again.  The last time I visited, it was in perfect condition.  I will not let him be nearly forgotten again.   



THE DASH

I read of a man who stood to speak at the funeral of a friend. He referred to the dates on the tombstone from the beginning… to the end.
He noted that first came the date of birth and spoke of the following date with tears, but he said what mattered most of all was the dash between those years.
For that dash represents all the time they spent alive on earth and now only those who loved them know what that little line is worth.
For it matters not, how much we own, the cars… the house… the cash. What matters is how we live and love and how we spend our dash.
So think about this long and hard; are there things you’d like to change? For you never know how much time is left that still can be rearranged.
To be less quick to anger and show appreciation more and love the people in our lives like we’ve never loved before.
If we treat each other with respect and more often wear a smile… remembering that this special dash might only last a little while.
So when your eulogy is being read, with your life’s actions to rehash, would you be proud of the things they say about how you lived your dash?
By Linda Ellis, Copyright © 2020 Inspire Kindness, thedashpoem.com

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - A Facebook "Have You Done This?" Meme

Now I realize it is no longer Saturday night, but I wasn't able to get this done then or yesterday, and I really wanted to play along - so here we are!

From Randy over at Genea-Musings:

it's Saturday Night 
time for more Genealogy Fun!!!



Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to:

(1) Another "Have you done this?" meme/quiz was going around Facebook last week.  Let's Do It!!

(2)  Copy and paste the list below, delete my answers, and add your own.

(3)  Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment to this blog post, or in a post on Facebook.

Here's mine:

(1)  Driven 100 mph:  I don't think so.  90 maybe...

(2)  Ridden in a helicopter:  No

(3)  Gone zip lining:  No

(4)  Been to an NFL Game:  No!  

(5)  Been to Canada:  No

(6)  Visited Florida:  Oh yes, many, many times.  Lived there for 4 years when I was a 
child.  Still have family there.  Though sadly, I have not been since moving to North Carolina 8 years ago.

(7)  Visited Mexico:  Yes, once.  Cozumel from a cruise ship.  Was very nervous (Have you ever read those State Department Travel Warnings from Mexico?!!) so stayed right there at the docks.  Shopped and drank.  

(8)  Visited Vegas:  No

(9)  Eaten alone at a restaurant:  Yes, but very rarely and only if I have a book with me to read so I don't look totally sad and lonely.  Usually in those situations, I just eat in my car.  

(10) Ability to read music:  Some memory is left from my childhood piano lessons.  

(11) Ridden a motorcycle:  Yes, but only as a passenger.

(12) Ridden a horse:  Yes, we owned horses when I was a child.  I don't think I've been on one since becoming an adult.

(13) Stayed in a hospital:  Only as a newborn.  (Let us pray that streak continues.)

(14) Donated blood:  Yes, but I just started donating last year, so I've only done it about 3 times.

(15)  Been snow skiing:  No

(16)  Been to Disneyworld or Disneyland:  Disneyworld yes!  2 or 3 times.  Refer to the Florida question above.  LOL.  It is definitely the happiest place on earth.

(17) Slept outside:  No... unless a cabin at camp or motor home count!!  ;)

(18) Driven a stick shift:  Yes, and I'm not good at it.  At all.

(19) Ridden in an 18 wheeler:  No

(20) Ridden in a police car:  Yes, but not for THAT reason.  My friends and I broke down in Montgomery, Alabama, and a kind policeman gave us a ride to an auto parts store.

(21)  Driven a boat:  Yes, some.  Lived on the lake when I was in college.

(22)  Eaten Escargot:  No!

(23) Been on a cruise:  Yes, twice.  First one sailed out of Port Canaveral, Florida and went to the Bahamas and Key West.  Second was a larger ship, and we sailed out of Tampa, Florida to the above mentioned Mexico and Grand Cayman (where I swam with sting rays!! One of the most awesome experiences of my life!!).

(24)  Run out of gas:  Never!

(25) Been on TV:  Not that I know of

(26) Eaten Sushi:  No!

(27) Seen a UFO: No

(28) Been bungie jumping:  No!!

(29) Visited another continentYes - Europe

(30) Been to Ellis Island:  No...

It's your turn....